BROWSE CATEGORIES

Monitoring Equipment

Safety Monitoring Equipment

Monitoring equipment are types of instruments that identify gas, noise and many more dangers within the environment and workplace.

Air monitoring equipment is designed to monitor the environmental conditions in the workplace or in the outdoor environment. There are a number of reasons to conduct air sampling or air monitoring within the workplace as potential hazards or exposures may be present to staff and the enviornment.

To ensure the welfare of staff, the community and the enviornment dust monitoring equipment is designed to ensure that the relevant regulations are being adhered to. Therefore, dust monitoring equipment is there to protect both the environment in which it operates as well as all staff involved in their operations.

Continuous emissions monitoring systems are used as a means to comply with air emission standards set out in law and regulated by environmental authorities in various countries. Facilities employ the use of CEMS to continuously collect, record and report the required emissions data. Typical monitored emissions include: sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen chloride, airborne particulate matter, mercury, volatile organic compounds, and oxygen. CEM systems can also measure air flow, flue gas opacity and moisture.

Gas monitoring and detecting equipment is used widely in industry to detect the presence of gases within an area, usually as part of a gas detector system to warn about various gases which might be harmful to humans. Gas detectors can be used to detect combustible, toxic and CO2 gases.

Due to the nature of some industries noise will be a by-product of its daily activities, so to ensure the welfare of both staff and the community in which it operates, noise monitoring equipment is designed to ensure that the relevant regulations are being adhered to. Therefore, noise measuring and monitoring equipment are there to protect both the environment in which it operates as well as all staff involved in their operations.

The emission of strong and undesirable odours is often a result of of the handling and treatment of waste water and other organic material, as well as other industrial processes which require odour monitoring. There are many techniques used to control or remove the odourous gases, nearly all requiring the injection of expensive chemical neutralisers  and/or the use of energy to pump the odorous air into a chemical scrubbing system. Whatever the method used, it is critical that the process is run efficiently and economically, by making gas measurements both before and after the treatment process.